AMAZING PHARAOHS ROYAL QUEEN 2

$124

AMAZING AND UNIQUE EGYPTIAN ART OF PHARAOHS QUEEN PAINTED , HANDMADE AND MADE IN EGYPT.

WEIGHT LBS 0.95

HEIGHT  5.11    WIDTH 2.16  length 6.29  INCHES

1 in stock

Description

Pharaoh, (from Egyptian per ʿaa, “great house”), originally, the royal palace in ancient Egypt. The word came to be used metonymically for the Egyptian king under the new kingdom (starting in the 18 th dynasty, 1539–1292 BCE), and by the 22 Nd dynasty, (c. 945–c. 730 BCE) it had been adopted as an epithet of respect. It was never the king’s formal title, though, and its modern use as a generic name for all Egyptian kings is based on the usage of the Hebrew bible.

The Egyptians believed their pharaoh to be the mediator between the gods and the world of men. After death the pharaoh became divine, identified with Osiris, the father of Horus and god of the dead, and passed on his sacred powers and position to the new pharaoh, his son. The pharaoh’s divine status was portrayed in allegorical terms: his uraeus (the snake on his crown) spat flames at his enemies; he was able to trample thousands of the enemy on the battlefield; and he was all-powerful, knowing everything and controlling nature and fertility.

DIMENSIONS

    HEIGHT 5.11 WIDTH 2.16 LENGTH 6.29  INCHES

    HEIGHT 13 WIDTH 5.5 LENGTH 16   CENTIMETERS  

      WEIGHT 435 GRAMS 0.95 LBS

QUANTITY

1 PIECE

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UNIQUE EGYPTIAN PHARAOHS QUEEN

Unique Egyptian Pharaohs Queen are the gods and goddesses worshipped in ancient Egypt. The beliefs and rituals surrounding these gods formed the core of ancient Egyptian religion, which emerged sometime in prehistory. Deities represented natural forces and phenomena, and the Egyptians supported and appeased them through offerings and rituals so that these forces would continue to function according to maat, or divine order. After the founding of the Egyptian state around 3100 BC, the authority to perform these tasks was controlled by the pharaoh, who claimed to be the gods’ representative and managed the temples where the rituals were carried out.

The gods’ complex characteristics were expressed in myths and in intricate relationships between deities: family ties, loose groups and hierarchies, and combinations of separate gods into one. Deities’ diverse appearances in art—as animals, humans, objects, and combinations of different forms—also alluded, through symbolism, to their essential features.

In different eras, various gods were said to hold the highest position in divine society, including the solar deity Ra, the mysterious god Amun, and the mother goddess Isis. The highest deity was usually credited with the creation of the world and often connected with the life-giving power of the sun. Some scholars have argued, based in part on Egyptian writings, that the Egyptians came to recognize a single divine power that lay behind all things and was present in all the other deities. Yet they never abandoned their original polytheistic view of the world, except possibly during the era of Atenism in the 14th century BC, when official religion focused exclusively on an abstract solar deity, the Aten.

Gods were assumed to be present throughout the world, capable of influencing natural events and the course of human lives. People interacted with them in temples and unofficial shrines, for personal reasons as well as for larger goals of state rites. Egyptians prayed for divine help, used rituals to compel deities to act, and called upon them for advice. Humans’ relations with their gods were a fundamental part of Egyptian society.

Characteristics of Amazing gifts Egyptian Deities

Modern knowledge of Egyptian beliefs about the gods is mostly drawn from religious writings produced by the nation’s scribes and priests. These people were the elite of Egyptian society and were very distinct from the general populace, most of whom were illiterate. Little is known about how well this broader population knew or understood the sophisticated ideas that the elite developed.[31] Commoners’ perceptions of the divine may have differed from those of the priests. The populace may, for example, have mistaken the religion’s symbolic statements about the gods and their actions for literal truth.[32] But overall, what little is known about popular religious belief is consistent with the elite tradition. The two traditions form a largely cohesive vision of the gods and their nature.[33]

Roles

Isis, a mother goddess and a patroness of kingship, holds Pharaoh Seti I in her lap.

Most Egyptian deities represent natural or social phenomena. The gods were generally said to be immanent in these phenomena—to be present within nature.[34] The types of phenomena they represented include physical places and objects as well as abstract concepts and forces.[35] The god Shu was the deification of all the world’s air; the goddess Meretseger oversaw a limited region of the earth, the Theban Necropolis; and the god Sia personified the abstract notion of perception.[36] Major gods were often involved in several types of phenomena. For instance, Khnum was the god of Elephantine Island in the midst of the Nile, the river that was essential to Egyptian civilization. He was credited with producing the annual Nile flood that fertilized the country’s farmland. Perhaps as an outgrowth of this life-giving function, he was said to create all living things, fashioning their bodies on a potter’s wheel.[37] Gods could share the same role in nature; Ra, Atum, Khepri, Horus, and other deities acted as sun gods.[38] Despite their diverse functions, most gods had an overarching role in common: maintaining maat, the universal order that was a central principle of Egyptian religion and was itself personified as a goddess.[39] Yet some deities represented disruption to maat. Most prominently, Apep was the force of chaos, constantly threatening to annihilate the order of the universe, and Set was an ambivalent member of divine society who could both fight disorder and foment it.[40]

Additional information

Weight 435 g
Dimensions 16 × 5.50 × 13 cm
DETAILS

HANDMADE , MADE IN EGYPT

MATERIALS

POLYSTONE

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