UNIQUE EGYPTIAN KHNUM STATUE

$145

UNIQUE EGYPTIAN  ART OF KHNUM STATUE BLACK ,HANDMADE AND MADE IN EGYPT .

WEIGHT LBS 2.34

HEIGHT  12.20    WIDTH 2.44  length 3.93    INCHES

1 in stock

Description

Pharaoh, (from Egyptian per ʿaa, “great house”), originally, the royal palace in ancient Egypt. The word came to be used metonymically for the Egyptian king under the new kingdom (starting in the 18 th dynasty, 1539–1292 BCE), and by the 22 Nd dynasty, (c. 945–c. 730 BCE) it had been adopted as an epithet of respect. It was never the king’s formal title, though, and its modern use as a generic name for all Egyptian kings is based on the usage of the Hebrew bible.

The Egyptians believed their pharaoh to be the mediator between the gods and the world of men. After death the pharaoh became divine, identified with Osiris, the father of Horus and god of the dead, and passed on his sacred powers and position to the new pharaoh, his son. The pharaoh’s divine status was portrayed in allegorical terms: his uraeus (the snake on his crown) spat flames at his enemies; he was able to trample thousands of the enemy on the battlefield; and he was all-powerful, knowing everything and controlling nature and fertility.

DIMENSIONS

    HEIGHT 12.20 WIDTH 2.44 LENGTH 3.93  INCHES

    HEIGHT 31 WIDTH 6.2LENGTH 10 CENTIMETERS  

      WEIGHT 1065 GRAMS 2.34 LBS

QUANTITY

1 PIECE

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UNIQUE EGYPTIAN KHNUM STATUE

UNIQUE EGYPTIAN Khnum STATUE or also romanised Khnemu (/kəˈnm/; Ancient Egyptian: 𓎸𓅱𓀭 ẖnmw, Koinē Greek: Χνοῦβις) was one of the earliest-known Egyptian deities, originally the god of the source of the Nile. Since the annual flooding of the Nile brought with it silt and clay, and its water brought life to its surroundings, he was thought to be the creator of the bodies of human children, which he made at a potter’s wheel, from clay, and placed in their mothers’ wombs. He was later described as having moulded the other deities, and he had the titles “Divine Potter” and “Lord of created things from himself”.

 UNIQUE EGYPTIAN KHNUM STATUE GENERAL INFORMATION

The worship of Khnum centered on two principal riverside sites, Elephantine and Esna, which were regarded as sacred sites. At Elephantine, he was worshipped alongside Satis and Anuket. At Esna, he was worshipped alongside Menhit, Nebtu, Neith and Heka. Khnum was regarded as the guardian of the source of the Nile River. His significance led to early theophoric names of him, for children, such as Khnum-Khufwy “Khnum is my Protector”, the full name of Khufu, builder of the Great Pyramid of Giza.[1]

Khnum has also been related to the deity Min.[2]

Temple at Elephantine

The temple at Elephantine was dedicated to Khnum, his consort Satis, and their daughter, Anuket. The temple dates back to at least the Middle Kingdom. By the Eleventh Dynasty, Khnum, Satis and Anuket are all attested at Elephantine.

During the New Kingdom, finds from the time of Ramesses II show Khnum was still worshipped there.[3]

Opposite Elephantine, on the east bank at Aswan, Khnum, Satis and Anuket are shown on a chapel wall dating to the Ptolemaic Kingdom.[3]

Temple at Esna

Cnouphis-Nilus (Jupiter-Nilus, Dieu Nil), N372.2, Brooklyn Museum

In Esna, a temple was dedicated to Khnum, Neith and Heka, among other deities. This temple began construction in Ptolemaic times, but most of the surviving parts of the temple were built in Roman times.[3]

Khnum is sometimes depicted as a crocodile-headed god. Nebt-uu and Menhit are Khnum’s principal consorts and Heka is his eldest son and successor. Both Khnum and Neith are referred to as creator deities in the texts at Esna. Khnum is sometimes referred to as the “father of the fathers” and Neith as the “mother of the mothers”. They later become the parents of Ra, who is also referred to as Khnum-Re.[4]

Additional information

Weight 1065 g
Dimensions 10 × 6.2 × 31 cm
DETAILS

HANDMADE , MADE IN EGYPT

MATERIALS

POLYSTONE COMPOSITE

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