UNIQUE EGYPTIAN HANDMADE PAPYRUS

$88

UNIQUE AND AMAZING HANDMADE EGYPTIAN PAPYRUS SHINES IN THE DARKNESS AND MADE IN EGYPT.

WEIGHT LBS 0.09

HEIGHT  16.33   WIDTH 12.40     INCHES

1 in stock

Description

Papyrus, writing material of ancient times and also the plant from which it was derived, also called paper plant. The papyrus plant was long cultivated in the Nile delta region in Egypt and was collected for its stalk or stem, whose central pith was cut into thin strips, pressed together, and dried to form a smooth thin writing surface.

DIMENSIONS

    HEIGHT 16.33 WIDTH 12.40   INCHES

    HEIGHT 41.5 WIDTH 31.5  CENTIMETERS  

      WEIGHT 45 GRAMS 0.09  LBS

QUANTITY

1 PIECE

PACKAGING

WE PACKING GOOD WRAPPED IN BOX TO ENSURE SAFE DELIVERY

CONDITION

NEW AS SHOWN IN PICTURES

HANDLING

1 BUSINESS DAY FROM RECEIVING PAYMENT

SHIPMENT

WE USE DHL FAST SHIPPING AND SHIP USING EXPEDITED SHIPPING (3 -9 BUSINESS DAYS)

RETURN

YOU CAN RETURN WITHIN 14 DAYS FROM RECEIVING ITEM

WE OFFER FREE RETURN OR EXCHANGE OR MONEY BACK REFUND

PAYMENT

WE OFFER DIFFERENT PAYMENT METHOD

PAYPAL                           PAYONNER

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EGYPTIAN HANDMADE PAPYRUS

 EGYPTIAN HANDMADE PAPYRUS  WE GUARANTEE THAT THE PAPYRUS PLANTED AND MADE IN OUR FACTORY AND FARM IS AN EGYPTIAN CRAFT ,AND HAS THE SAME CHEMICAL AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES THAT OUR ANCIENT EGYPTIAN PAPYRUS HAD.

IT HAS THE SAME FIBERS,THE DARK LEGENIC CELLS,THE HORIZONTAL AND VERTICAL LINES.

ITS ABILITY TO BE ROLLED IN ADDITION TO LONG LIFE ,YOU CAN WRITE ON THE PAPYRUS,USING WATER COLOR,OIL COLOR,COAL AND THE TYPEWRITER.

EGYPTIAN HANDMADE PAPYRUS  (/pəˈprəs/ pə-PYE-rəs) is a material similar to thick paper that was used in ancient times as a writing surface. It was made from the pith of the papyrus plant, Cyperus papyrus, a wetland sedge.[1] Papyrus (plural: papyri) can also refer to a document written on sheets of such material, joined together side by side and rolled up into a scroll, an early form of a book.

Papyrus is first known to have been used in Egypt (at least as far back as the First Dynasty), as the papyrus plant was once abundant across the Nile Delta. It was also used throughout the Mediterranean region and in the Kingdom of Kush. Apart from a writing material, ancient Egyptians employed papyrus in the construction of other artifacts, such as reed boats, mats, rope, sandals, and baskets.[2]

History

AMAZING EGYPTIAN GIFTS PAPYRUS  was first manufactured in Egypt as far back as the fourth millennium BCE.[3][4][5] The earliest archaeological evidence of papyrus was excavated in 2012 and 2013 at Wadi al-Jarf, an ancient Egyptian harbor located on the Red Sea coast. These documents, the Diary of Merer, date from c. 2560–2550 BCE (end of the reign of Khufu).[4] The papyrus rolls describe the last years of building the Great Pyramid of Giza.[6] In the first centuries BCE and CE, papyrus scrolls gained a rival as a writing surface in the form of parchment, which was prepared from animal skins.[7] Sheets of parchment were folded to form quires from which book-form codices were fashioned. Early Christian writers soon adopted the codex form, and in the Græco-Roman world, it became common to cut sheets from papyrus rolls to form codices.

Codices were an improvement on the papyrus scroll, as the papyrus was not pliable enough to fold without cracking and a long roll, or scroll, was required to create large-volume texts. Papyrus had the advantage of being relatively cheap and easy to produce, but it was fragile and susceptible to both moisture and excessive dryness. Unless the papyrus was of perfect quality, the writing surface was irregular, and the range of media that could be used was also limited.

Codices were an improvement on the papyrus scroll, as the papyrus was not pliable enough to fold without cracking and a long roll, or scroll, was required to create large-volume texts. Papyrus had the advantage of being relatively cheap and easy to produce, but it was fragile and susceptible to both moisture and excessive dryness. Unless the papyrus was of perfect quality, the writing surface was irregular, and the range of media that could be used was also limited.

Papyrus was replaced in Europe by the cheaper, locally produced products parchment and vellum, of significantly higher durability in moist climates, though Henri Pirenne‘s connection of its disappearance with the Muslim conquest of Egypt is contested.[8] Its last appearance in the Merovingian chancery is with a document of 692, though it was known in Gaul until the middle of the following century. The latest certain dates for the use of papyrus are 1057 for a papal decree (typically conservative, all papal bulls were on papyrus until 1022), under Pope Victor II,[9] and 1087 for an Arabic document. Its use in Egypt continued until it was replaced by less expensive paper introduced by the Islamic world who originally learned of it from the Chinese. By the 12th century, parchment and paper were in use in the Byzantine Empire, but papyrus was still an option.[10]

Additional information

Weight 45 g
Dimensions 31.5 × 41.5 cm
DETAILS

HANDMADE , MADE IN EGYPT

MATERIALS

EGYPTIAN PAPYRUS PLANT

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