ANCIENT GODDESS HATHOR STATUE

$206

Statue of Hathor Protecting Psamtik This schist statue depicts Psammetik standing in a posture of prayer heavy black made in Egypt

WEIGHT LBS 7.04

HEIGHT  9.64    WIDTH 3.39  length 8.14  INCHES

1 in stock

Description

Hathor, in ancient Egyptian religion, goddess of the sky, of women, and of fertility and love. Hathor’s worship originated in early dynastic times (3rd millennium BCE). The name Hathor means “estate of Horus” and may not be her original name. Her principal animal form was that of a cow, and she was strongly associated with motherhood. Hathor was closely connected with the sun god Ra of Heliopolis. Whose “eye” or daughter she was said to be. In her cult center at Dandarah in upper Egypt, she was worshiped with Horus.

DIMENSIONS

    HEIGHT 9.64 WIDTH 3.39 LENGTH 8.14  INCHES

    HEIGHT 24.5 WIDTH 8.6 LENGTH 20.7  CENTIMETERS  

      WEIGHT 3195 GRAMS 7.04 LBS

QUANTITY

1 PIECE

PACKAGING

WE PACKING GOOD WRAPPED IN BOX TO ENSURE SAFE DELIVERY

CONDITION

USED AS SHOWN IN PICTURES

HANDLING

1 BUSINESS DAY FROM RECEIVING PAYMENT

SHIPMENT

WE USE DHL FAST SHIPPING AND SHIP USING EXPEDITED SHIPPING (3 -9 BUSINESS DAYS)

RETURN

YOU CAN RETURN WITHIN 14 DAYS FROM RECEIVING ITEM

WE OFFER FREE RETURN OR EXCHANGE OR MONEY BACK REFUND

PAYMENT

WE OFFER DIFFERENT PAYMENT METHOD

PAYPAL                           PAYONNER

CONTACT US

FEEL FREE TO ASK ANY QUESTIONS BEFORE PURCHASING, AS THIS MATTERS TO US

THANKS TO VISIT OUR STORE IT’S A REALLY BIG HONOR FOR US.

ANCIENT GIFTS GODDESS HATHOR STATUE

Ancient gifts goddess Hathor statue (Ancient Egyptian: ḥwt-ḥr “House of Horus”, Greek: Ἁθώρ Hathōr) was a major goddess in ancient Egyptian religion who played a wide variety of roles. As a sky deity, she was the mother or consort of the sky god Horus and the sun god Ra, both of whom were connected with kingship, and thus she was the symbolic mother of their earthly representatives, the pharaohs. She was one of several goddesses who acted as the Eye of Ra, Ra’s feminine counterpart, and in this form she had a vengeful aspect that protected him from his enemies. Her beneficent side represented music, dance, joy, love, sexuality and maternal care, and she acted as the consort of several male deities and the mother of their sons. These two aspects of the goddess exemplified the Egyptian conception of femininity. Hathor crossed boundaries between worlds, helping deceased souls in the transition to the afterlife.

Sky goddess

Ancient gifts goddess Hathor was given the epithets “mistress of the sky” and “mistress of the stars”, and was said to dwell in the sky with Ra and other sun deities. Egyptians thought of the sky as a body of water through which the sun god sailed, and they connected it with the waters from which, according to their creation myths, the sun emerged at the beginning of time. This cosmic mother goddess was often represented as a cow. Hathor and Mehet-Weret were both thought of as the cow who birthed the sun god and placed him between her horns. Like Nut, Hathor was said to give birth to the sun god each dawn.[14]

Hathor’s Egyptian name was ḥwt-ḥrw[15] or ḥwt-ḥr.[16] It is typically translated “house of Horus” but can also be rendered as “my house is the sky”.[17] The falcon god Horus represented, among other things, the sun and sky. The “house” referred to may be the sky in which Horus lives, or the goddess’s womb from which he, as a sun god, is born each day.[18]

ANCIENT GIFTS GODDESS HATHOR ( Solar goddess )

Hathor was a solar deity, a feminine counterpart to sun gods such as Horus and Ra, and was a member of the divine entourage that accompanied Ra as he sailed through the sky in his barque.[18] She was commonly called the “Golden One”, referring to the radiance of the sun, and texts from her temple at Dendera say “her rays illuminate the whole earth.”[19] She was sometimes fused with another goddess, Nebethetepet, whose name can mean “Lady of the Offering”, “Lady of Contentment”,[20] or “Lady of the Vulva”.[21] At Ra’s cult center of Heliopolis, Hathor-Nebethetepet was worshipped as his consort,[22] and the Egyptologist Rudolf Anthes argued that Hathor’s name referred to a mythical “house of Horus” at Heliopolis that was connected with the ideology of kingship.[23]

She was one of many goddesses to take the role of the Eye of Ra, a feminine personification of the disk of the sun and an extension of Ra’s own power. Ra was sometimes portrayed inside the disk, which Troy interprets as meaning that the Eye goddess was thought of as a womb from which the sun god was born. Hathor’s seemingly contradictory roles as mother, wife, and daughter of Ra reflected the daily cycle of the sun. At sunset the god entered the body of the goddess, impregnating her and fathering the deities born from her womb at sunrise: himself and the Eye goddess, who would later give birth to him. Ra gave rise to his daughter, the Eye goddess, who in turn gave rise to him, her son, in a cycle of constant regeneration.[24]

Music, dance, and joy

Banquet scene from the tomb chapel of Nebamun, 14th century BC. Its imagery of music and dancing alludes to Hathor.[30]

Egyptian religion celebrated the sensory pleasures of life, believed to be among the gods’ gifts to humanity. Egyptians ate, drank, danced, and played music at their religious festivals. They perfumed the air with flowers and incense. Many of Hathor’s epithets link her to celebration; she is called the mistress of music, dance, garlands, myrrh, and drunkenness. In hymns and temple reliefs, musicians play tambourines, harps, lyres, and sistra in Hathor’s honor.[31] The sistrum, a rattle-like instrument, was particularly important in Hathor’s worship. Sistra had erotic connotations and, by extension, alluded to the creation of new life.[3

Additional information

Weight 3195 g
Dimensions 20.70 × 8.60 × 24.50 cm
DETAILS

HANDMADE , MADE IN EGYPT

MATERIALS

HARD STONE

Reviews

There are no reviews yet.

Be the first to review “ANCIENT GODDESS HATHOR STATUE”

Your email address will not be published.