ANCIENT EGYPTIAN SENENMUT STATUE

$110

ANCIENT AND VINTAGE EGYPTIAN SENENMUT SEATED STATUE HARD STONE HOLDING THE PRINCESS NEFERURE IN HIS ARMS. HANDMADE, MADE IN EGYPT

WEIGHT LBS 2.36

HEIGHT 5.90    WIDTH 2.16  length 3.74    INCHES

1 in stock

Description

Senenmut first enters the historical record on a national level as the “Steward of the God’s Wife” (Hatshepsut) and “Steward of the King’s Daughter” (Neferure) some Egyptologists place Senenmut’s entry into royal service during the reign of Thutmose, but place Senenmut’s entry into royal service during the reign of Thutmose or while Hatshepsut was still regent and not pharaoh. After Hatshepsut was crowned pharaoh, Senenmut was given more prestigious titles and became high steward of the king.

DIMENSIONS

    HEIGHT 5.90 WIDTH 2.16  LENGTH 3.74  INCHES

    HEIGHT 15 WIDTH 5.5 LENGTH 9.5  CENTIMETERS  

      WEIGHT  1070 GRAMS 2.36  LBS

QUANTITY

1 PIECE

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CONDITION

USED AS SHOWN IN PICTURES

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ANCIENT EGYPTIAN SENENMUT STATUE

Senenmut (Ancient Egyptian: sn-n-mwt, sometimes spelled Senmut, Senemut, or Senmout) was an 18th Dynasty ancient Egyptian architect and government official. His name translates literally as “mother’s brother.”[1]

Career

Senenmut first enters the historical record on a national level as the “Steward of the God’s Wife” (Hatshepsut) and “Steward of the King’s Daughter” (Neferure). Some Egyptologists place Senenmut’s entry into royal service during the reign of Thutmose I, but it is far more likely that it occurred during either the reign of Thutmose II or while Hatshepsut was still regent and not pharaoh. After Hatshepsut was crowned pharaoh, Senenmut was given more prestigious titles and became high steward of the king.

Senenmut supervised the quarrying, transport, and erection of twin obelisks, at the time the tallest in the world, at the entrance to the Temple of Karnak. Neither stands today though they were commemorated in the Chapelle Rouge. Karnak’s Red Chapel was intended as a barque shrine and may have originally stood between the two obelisks. (The remaining obelisks of Hatshepsut were erected in Year Fifteen as part of her Heb Sed Festival; one still stands in the Temple of Karnak whilst the other is in pieces, having fallen many centuries ago.)

Senenmut claims to be the chief architect of Hatshepsut’s works at Deir el-Bahri.[5] Senenmut’s masterpiece building project was the Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut, also known as the Djeser-Djeseru, designed and implemented by Senenmut on a site on the west bank of the Nile, close to the entrance to the Valley of the Kings. The focal point was the Djeser-Djeseru or “the Sublime of the Sublimes” mortuary temple-(‘Holy (of) Holiests’), a colonnaded structure of perfect harmony built nearly one thousand years before the Parthenon. Djeser-Djeseru sits atop a series of terraces that were once graced with gardens. It is built into a cliff face that rises sharply above it. Djeser-Djeseru and the other buildings of the Deir el-Bahri complex are considered to be among the great buildings of the ancient world. The building complex design is thought to be derived from the mortuary temple of Mentuhotep II built nearly 500 years earlier at Deir-el-Bahri.[6] Senenmut’s importance at the royal court under Hatshepsut is unquestionable:

Although it is not known where he is buried, Senenmut had a chapel and a tomb constructed for himself. The chapel is at (TT71) in the Tombs of the Nobles and the tomb is at (TT353), near Hatshepsut’s mortuary temple, and contains a famous star ceiling. They were both heavily vandalized during the reign of Thutmose III, perhaps during the latter’s campaign to eradicate all trace of Hatshepsut’s memory. Neither tomb by itself was complete, as would be expected of an Egyptian tomb for a person of high standing. TT71 is a typical Theban Tomb chapel, but does not have burial chambers. TT353 is fully underground without any overground chapel. They complement each other and are only, together, a full burial monument.[12]

Additional information

Weight 1070 g
Dimensions 9.5 × 5.5 × 15 cm
DETAILS

HANDMADE , MADE IN EGYPT

MATERIALS

HARD STONE

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